Some of my assignments this past couple weeks at ASU

Blog Post: Gabriel Orozco

ART 331 Gabriel Orozco Horses Running Endlessly Munier_Nancy 11 Sept 2021

This work references two things, free running never ending and the game of Chess. The social aspect is that of games being played that may have no real end and by using 4 sets of horses, each in a different wood color he also taps into the fact that no matter the color, we are still on the same board/world. He used everyday items of wood and his favorite theme of games to create a work of beauty that, like Ping Pond Table, encourages us to work in groups and still go our own way.

Blog Post: Chakaia Booker & Joseph Cornell

My first impression is of someone redirecting recycled items… rubber mostly. As a collection, all of her work is done with multiple shades of grays and blacks. This is inherent to the items she collects as most rubber such as tires is in the black/gray range. Her one she calls ‘’gridlock’’ mkes me thing of thousands of small fish schooling and running over each other.

Joesph Cornell was a collector of smalls and that being more along some of my collections is intriguing to me. In contrast to Booker, Cornell doesn’t really change the items he collected but presented them in eye pleasing ways.

Homework Week 2: Due Tuesday 8/24/21

In comparing Gates and Milner I see both are collectors of things that are everyday. But the contrast is in that Gates is very structured and Milner is very scattered or unstructured. They both show interest in preserving history but Milner is more of a hoarder collector. Gates emphasizes his collections in structured and organized layouts whereas Milner seems to just shove stuff together in any fashion that strikes him at the moment. Art and collections being used to preserve history.

Encounters with Art ARA 240

This was a class assignment to illustrate my thought process on my journey in art…. or atleast that is what I thought she wanted!

Mind Map                                Nancy Munier                ARA 240                      August 29,2021

My mind has had many years to travel and see great art.   At birth, I was gifted two oil paintings from the artist, Wm. Thon.  (he had a crush on my mother)   I still have those paintings, very dark landscapes, and not his typical sailing work. (painting is “Snowy Woods by Wm Thon 1948)A picture containing text, indoor, window, picture frame

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I grew up with very artistic but not recognized artists at home and in the local area.  At around eight years (I have little memory of much time), A friend of my mother, Helen Ord, did a bust of me.  It was agony! I had to sit, and I hated being still for two hours every day for a week as the artist sculpted clay and measured my nose with massive calipers!  The bust is long gone, but I do have one of her oil paintings still.  I wanted to paint but was only given cheap chalk and paper.  My mother said it was because I wasn’t good enough to use watercolors.  Years later, I found out it was because we didn’t have the money for fancy stuff.  I often got in trouble at school, especially elementary, for drawing horses in my notebooks!  Yes, I still draw, and now in school, it is expected.  I have some of my early crayon drawings of horses which I hope to work into some sculpture pieces.  It was also during these young years we visited the Ringling Art Museum in Sarasota, Florida.  The statue of David was only one of several statues I sketched there.

School years gone, I moved to Wyoming and continued to sketch and draw and write.  I am glad I did since I now can look back and see themes beginning to appear in my work, primarily trees. But then, college and marriage and a little girl came into life.  She was drawing before she could walk, and only once on the wall of our apartment. (military housing hates anything on the walls!)

We were fortunate enough to travel to and live in Europe, so family time was well spent finding art museums.  My husband was also a lover of art.  The most profound art exhibit was at Checkpoint Charley in Berlin. We were there when the wall was being torn down and got to visit the museum.  My ten-year-old daughter walked out of the museum, saying it was the most moving thing she had ever experience.  Today she still stands by that statement.  The art of the people was horrible and beautiful at the same time.    A bit later, on a trip to Paris, we saw a Monet and Roden exhibit.  Outside in the park, there is the statue of The Thinker.  I prepared to take a photo of my family by the monument, and my husband leans on the sculpture, daughter on the top edge of the base. I tell them, “That is Roden’s grave. He was buried under that statue”. They both freaked out!  (This information is on the sign in front of the statue.)

Back home in Wyoming, I spent happy hours sketching on the University of Wyoming campus…usually under the bronze of T-Rex outside the Geology building.   The Lincon Monument on me 80 between Cheyenne and Laramie is massive and looks like a rooster when approaching from Cheyenne.  

A brief time at Southern Utah University gave me the chance to study art formally.  And a three-week trip back to London with a group of students left me in awe of the city’s architecture.  I had been in London in 1991 while traveling in Great Britain, and the skyline had changed.  I took many photos of old and new buildings side by side.  I also filled two sketchbooks and saw great plays every night for ten days. Then, I attended a Gold Work class at The Royal School of Needlework at Hampton Court for the last three days.   That was a high point in my textile studies.

I am here in Arizona studying sculpture after a short bit of textiles and getting my second Bachelor’s degree.   From here, but staying in Arizona, I am not sure where life will take me.  Art gives me so many options. I am currently working out of my garage and hoping to find a small studio space in Apache Junction.  I hope to do some work with museums, possibly doing dioramas of the floor plans in miniature settings.  Life will tell.

This last photo is of a challenge piece of stitchery I did for an exhibit at The San Franciso School of Needlework and Design.  The title is Jewels Benithe the Sea and required the use of 50 Swarzki Crystals and needlework.  The canvas is hand-painted, and many of the coral bits are ones I found as a child in Florida.

3 D Design Mass project March 23, 2021

“Life as a Beach… Or constant change.”

Mass is represented as the earth and its mass of sand and water.  The palm tree’s top also has mass to help balance the design, yet the slanted trunk gives a motion and direction leading the eye to the tag in the upper corner.  The open area under the tree on the right side represents a house and home stable and solid. The left side open area is of fractured and broken material as life is often fractured but heading to the solid tree of life.  The water with one specific wave is on the left side, directing the wind and tilt of the tree. The pebbly base of sand is the roughness of life, with tiny seashells representing signs of life and new beginnings.   The tree trunk of glass beads showing the fragile, breakable glass of life and the roughness of the world.  The tree itself – a bendable, flexible base with flowing fronds – shows the desire to be flexible, flowing yet anchored to the sandy earth even as the wind blows and tosses the fronds about.  Although most of the shells are of subdued colors, there is a bright spot in the lower right corner giving hope for life.  The two coconuts are symbolic of the two lives reaching for the sky, yet eventually, both will fall to the earth and wash out to the sea.  Sharp edges speak of shattered dreams and cracking spaces, and smooth ones around the “home” space show a calm, secure space.  Tiny scratches on the water are the bits of turbulence in the world and how they erode the earthly base’s mass.  As the earthly beach is eroded by the rough water of life, small, some bright shells of life appear to delight the eye.

  Rough and smooth shells, some shinny, some dull, some bright, some circles and lines, pointy and not. Flat and round, oval and spiral such as life.

I enjoyed doing this project once I figured out how to cast the negative spaces with the foam.  Being able to carve on the material. What I would do differently next time, and there will be the next time, would be not to use as much glue when putting layers of foam together.  Also to make sure to smooth the foam edges and perhaps even put a bit of angle, so they are more easily removed.  I do think the thickness I chose worked well with the project.  The plaster should have been thicker to start with so the pebbles on the bottom of the project did not slide around so much.   I am happy with not using any paint and keeping the white material as part of the main design element.

Project:  To create a 12 in by 12 in by 4 to 6 inches deep sculpture from plaster of Paris.  This should show mass and open-air with found objects and have meaning to the builder/artist.

Materials used:  plywood for the form for casting, hot glue, screws, foam board and other plastic,  Murphy’s oil soap for release agent, Plaster of Paris and found objects.

Procedure:  formulate an idea to be able to reproduce negative space areas in the final casting.  Cut plywood for a 12 in by 12 in base and 4 sides 12 in long by 6 in wide and make a box.  Using purple foam cut with the band saw to form the negative areas and hot glue to the bottom of the box (or sides if wanted) also hot glue all box seams.  Slather the interior of the box with Murphy’s oil soap. Prepare to cast material by gently sifting it into a bucket of water until small island forms in the center of the water, mix, and apply to the interior of the box.  Attach any items as the material sets up. Let dry for at least 48 hours. Finish with found objects, paint, resin, or in whatever manner you wish.

“That’s a Nice Box” Sculpture I

The box is a sewing box featuring thread spindles on the front porch along with magnets to hold needles.  The inside has two compartments.  The top is well padded to use as a pin holder and is totally removable so it can be set on table closer to the stitching being done.

I used a basic square box design but put it on a longer base to accommodate the thread spindles.  The cuts used were rip, cross cut, miter and dado. I used table saw, drill press, router, air compressor nail (brad) gun and angle bracts to form corners at 45 degrees.  I used wood glue and small staples to secure box parts.  The exterior was covered with quilt pieces, quilt batting and paint.  I put a base of heavy core poster board on bottom to protect furniture. 

The hardest part of this project was learning to use the Tinkercad program.  I used graph paper also to figure out layout of shapes for cutting MSD board.  TinkerCad is a challenge since I didn’t realize I could not size the project to actual size, the TinkerCad base would only go to 39.9 inches and I needed 48 inches.  The only other part I had an issue with was the brad gun since I was not as perfect with using it as I could have been, spacing of brads was not even.  Also the holes for the thread spindles should have been deeper.  The wooden dowels were ½ in diameter and were a bit small for holes I used.

All in all, this was a fun project once I relaxed about working in a crowded room and having to wait on equipment. (I am used to working in my own shop and building much larger things.)

Completion date Feb. 2021

ART 115 3-D Design Project 1

Well, I am off and running and having fun. Here is project 1. Relief.

This project was to be made as topographical style of some area that had meaning to you. Made out of 1/8 in cardboard, it really spoke to me to do part of Wyoming. Although it is not of the exact part of the search area, I chose the one of Johnson Creek Reservoir road for the feeling of depth. Reflecting back on a search we did for a 62 year old male, I keep remembering how scary some of the area was. I literally crawled part of it on my knees and elbows! The thought of why an old lady like me, I was around 60 at the time, should be doing this search still wanders thru my mind. Never think you cant challenge yourself and come out better for it, I learned a lot about myself up there on the Bluegrass creek. And I have learned something else about me in doing this sculpture, I love sculpture… not just seeing it but doing it! Yep, changing my major, partly thanks to encouragement from my Sculpture 1 instructor.

As to the actual nuts and bolts, or cardboard and glue, work: Use of the internet to find the USGS map, and thanks to Staples for enlarging the section I decided to use. Careful tracing on layers of cardboard then cutting with Excato knives and polishing edges with the Dremel sander discs. Lots of alignment and layer by layer glue (Elmer’s) and adding a touch of water in the form of Rainbow Gallery braid.